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LIJTE 2020 : The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education (Call for Papers)

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Link: https://docs.google.com/document/u/1/d/e/2PACX-1vRw155q1R1rYtIQaZ7r2VwWtDstdoDaulga3UXA-6mwiC1yFELmSlS9n4Gi9CxeiEuZa5QI8hfyu1UG/pub
 
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Submission Deadline Mar 15, 2020
Notification Due Apr 16, 2020
Final Version Due Apr 16, 2020
Categories    smart cities   higher education   ethics   technology
 

Call For Papers

The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education (LIJTE), University of Denver Digital Commons

Volume 1 Issue 2

Call for Papers


Open Access Peer Reviewed Journal Website: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/theliminal/

Volume 1 Issue 2 CFP: “Higher Education’s Role in the Development of Smart Cities.”

http://bit.ly/liminal2019


Deadline for Submissions

First Call for Submission: November 15, 2019.

Full Manuscript for Review: March 15, 2020.

Revisions Due: April 16, 2020.



Editorial Board


Co-Editors-in-Chief

Sherry Jones, Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Johns Hopkins University

Bio | theliminaljournal@gmail.com

Kae Novak, Front Range Community College, eLearning Consortium of Colorado

novak.kae@gmail.com


Managing Editor

Heather Tobin, University of Denver

Chris Luchs, CCConline, Old Dominion University


Book Review Editor

Donna Hall, Front Range Community College

Chris Luchs, CCConline, Old Dominion University


Art Editor

Terri Balogh, Metropolitan State University of Denver


Editorial Board

Dr. Farah Bennani, Mercer County Community College

Dr. Cynthia Calongne, Colorado Technical University

Spencer Ellis, Colorado Department of Higher Education

LinkedIn | spencer.ellis@dhe.state.co.us

Dr. Thomas Keefe, Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design

Bio

Raul B. Moreno, Clark College

Website

Dr. Barbara Truman, University of Central Florida


Reviewer

Tameca Coleman, Regis University

Ryan Lambert, Colorado School of Mines, Community College of Denver

Tina Morrell, Colorado Technical University

Kelly Zepp, Community College of Denver


Volume 1 Issue 2 CFP: “Higher Education’s Role in the Development of Smart Cities.”

By

Editor-in-Chief: Sherry Jones

Contact: theliminaljournal@gmail.com

Smart city is a multivalent term defined by the interests of those who wish to participate in progressive city development. The term commonly refers to technological urban development with interconnected devices, services, and infrastructure. Some advocates define smart city initiatives as data-driven smart urbanism, while others desire to re-label smart cities as sustainable cities to emphasize sustainability as a key design element. Even discussions about designing smart cities as pan cities, which collect data, connect and correlate domains of city services (converted into technological modules with sensors and IOTs), are central to governments' and industries' conversations about the future of urban development with connectivity.

In general, advocates intend for smart cities to exhibit the following characteristics:

- urban empowerment and enhancement of citizens’ living conditions through technological and/or spatial design;
- increase of connectivity between city housing, infrastructure, and municipalities;
- application of AI and sensors to efficiently monitor and manage a city’s infrastructure, public works, and services;
- application of AI to facilitate commerce between businesses and between social groups;
- application of AI and sensors to respond to natural disasters, emergencies, and events;
- automation and connectivity of transportation of people and goods in a city and between cities;
- urban development that promotes a sustainable future, such as installing Boeri Studio’s vertical forest architecture to create buildings that function as microclimates to reduce CO2 emissions;
- urban development that promotes technological sovereignty;
- engagement of citizens in participatory development;
- engagement of citizens in e-governance, smart urban governance, and open governance.

Numerous international government driven smart city initiatives are underway to ensure that smart cities are not designed to support technocracies. Cities Coalition for Digital Rights, Barcelona Digital City, Detroit Digital Justice Coalition, Seattle Community Technology Advisory Board, Amsterdam Tada!, Smart London Board, and Smart Dubai AI Ethics Advisory Board (Kitchen, 2019) are major advocates for responsible technology-driven urban development.

Academia also has launched initiatives and ethics boards for creating policies to prevent smart cities from becoming AI-enabled surveillance capitalist states, such as “Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence and MIT/Harvard's Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence Initiative), research bodies such as the Ada Lovelace Institute, companies (see Google's short-lived Advanced Technology External Advisory Council), governments (the EU High-Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence), and stakeholder coalitions (Data for Black Lives and Partnership on AI)” (Kitchen, 2019). The various initiatives reveal great concerns that smart cities may pose a threat to democracy and citizens’ rights to privacy and autonomy.

Smart city initiatives pose significant questions for higher education: What is higher education’s role in ensuring that smart city design and development will create just societies that can minimize the digital divide and differential access? How can higher education support e-governance, smart urban governance, or open governance? How will higher education’s role as the steward of scholarly and credible information change as AI, automation, IOTs, and urban big data become the main disseminators and managers of information? Can multidisciplinary educational initiatives collaborate with industries to drive the ethical redevelopment of smart cities?

Conversations regarding the implementation of smart cities are not without controversy; numerous ethical issues can arise due to smart city’s reliance on AI, algorithms, sensors, surveillance systems, and IOTs for its design. Technocracies, technological gentrification, surveillance capitalism, automated racism (such as China’s targeted surveillance program and facial recognition tracking of the Uighurs), digital divide, ethics-washing (such as Facebook’s ethics report), greenwashing, differential access, hacking, privacy, and data ownership are just some of the issues that can arise from technological urban development. The issues also are the focus of this issue of The Liminal journal’s call for papers (CFP).

In this volume 1 issue 2 of The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education, we are interested in papers that address the following topics:

- The role of higher education in the design and development of smart cities as just cities, ethical cities, and sustainable cities for urban empowerment and participatory engagement.
- The role of higher education as the steward of scholarly and credible information as AI, automation, IOTs, and big data become the main disseminators and managers of information in smart cities.
- The role of higher education to support or guide smart urban governance and open governance in smart cities.
- Proposal for the ethical redevelopment of smart cities.
- The future of education and educational institutions in smart cities.
- The future of education in smart information systems (SIS) and urban science.

- Lesson, curriculum, and/or theoretical framework for addressing:
--- the design of smart city spaces as educational spaces, teaching and learning spaces.
--- the design of smart city spaces for urban empowerment (ex. creating design solutions for minimizing inequality and inequity of people living in different parts of a city).
--- the design of smart cities as just cities and ethical cities.
--- the design of smart cities to promote citizen participation and digital inclusion.
--- the design of smart cities to enable smart citizens.
--- the design of smart cities to enable technological sovereignty.
--- the design of smart cities as sustainable cities.
--- the design of ethical AI for smart cities.
--- the design of smart cities that promotes data feminism.
--- the design of e-governance, open governance, and democrative governance in smart cities.
--- the issues of smart cities and AI and algorithm subverting process, democracy, and governance.
--- the issues of ensuring social justice in smart cities.
--- the issues of protecting personal data and digital rights of citizens living in a smart city.
--- the issues of privatization and contract archaeology in the economy of smart cities.
--- the issues of smart cities becoming enforcers or the supporting arms of technocracies.
--- the issues of technological gentrification in smart cities.
--- the issues of big data negatively impacting communities due to race, economics, and other disparities in smart cities.
--- the issues that ethics-washing and greenwashing pose to sustainable cities.
--- the issues of data ownership, digital rights, privacy, and consent in smart cities.
--- the issues of AI and algorithm transparency and accountability in smart city design.
--- the issues of cybersecurity and safety from hacking while living in smart cities.
--- the issues of surveillance capitalism driving smart city initiatives.
--- the issues that technocracies pose against education, cultures, religions, and politics.
--- the issues of surveillance and automated racism in smart cities.

- Design proposal/Critical analysis of digital art or performative piece that frames issues associated with technology and smart city development.
- Design proposal/Critical analysis of digital game that frames issues of or simulates technological environments in smart cities.
- Design proposal/Critical analysis of software, applications, IOTs, smart information systems for creating smart cities that are just, sustainable, and ethical.

We welcome both industry leaders and scholars from the disciplines of art, humanities, engineering, design, technology, education, and the sciences to contribute to the Liminal.

Sherry Jones, Editor-in-Chief
The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education
Journal Website: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/theliminal/
CFP: http://bit.ly/liminal2019
Email: theliminaljournal@gmail.com

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